A method to estimate the number of neurons supporting visual orientation discrimination in primates

Ruben Coen Cagli, Ingmar Kanitscheider, Alexandre Pouget

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this method article, we show how to estimate of the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), and the number of lateral genicular nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) neurons involved in visual orientation discrimination tasks. We reported the results of this calculation in Kanitscheider et al. (2015), where we were interested in comparing the number of neurons in the visual periphery versus visual cortex for a specific experiment. This calculation allows estimation of the information content at different stages of the visual pathway, which can be used to assess the efficiency of the computations performed. As these numbers are generally not readily available but may be useful to other researchers, we explain here in detail how we obtained them. The calculation is straightforward, and simply requires combining anatomical and physiological information about the macaque visual pathway. Similar information could be used to repeat the calculation for other species or modalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1752
JournalF1000Research
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Visual Pathways
Visual Cortex
Primates
Neurons
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Macaca
Knee
Cell Count
Research Personnel
Experiments

Keywords

  • Population coding
  • Vision
  • Visual cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

A method to estimate the number of neurons supporting visual orientation discrimination in primates. / Coen Cagli, Ruben; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pouget, Alexandre.

In: F1000Research, Vol. 6, 1752, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{58af2bea00494ef5a0add5d4f4930f97,
title = "A method to estimate the number of neurons supporting visual orientation discrimination in primates",
abstract = "In this method article, we show how to estimate of the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), and the number of lateral genicular nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) neurons involved in visual orientation discrimination tasks. We reported the results of this calculation in Kanitscheider et al. (2015), where we were interested in comparing the number of neurons in the visual periphery versus visual cortex for a specific experiment. This calculation allows estimation of the information content at different stages of the visual pathway, which can be used to assess the efficiency of the computations performed. As these numbers are generally not readily available but may be useful to other researchers, we explain here in detail how we obtained them. The calculation is straightforward, and simply requires combining anatomical and physiological information about the macaque visual pathway. Similar information could be used to repeat the calculation for other species or modalities.",
keywords = "Population coding, Vision, Visual cortex",
author = "{Coen Cagli}, Ruben and Ingmar Kanitscheider and Alexandre Pouget",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.12688/f1000research.12398.1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "F1000Research",
issn = "2046-1402",
publisher = "F1000 Research Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A method to estimate the number of neurons supporting visual orientation discrimination in primates

AU - Coen Cagli, Ruben

AU - Kanitscheider, Ingmar

AU - Pouget, Alexandre

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - In this method article, we show how to estimate of the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), and the number of lateral genicular nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) neurons involved in visual orientation discrimination tasks. We reported the results of this calculation in Kanitscheider et al. (2015), where we were interested in comparing the number of neurons in the visual periphery versus visual cortex for a specific experiment. This calculation allows estimation of the information content at different stages of the visual pathway, which can be used to assess the efficiency of the computations performed. As these numbers are generally not readily available but may be useful to other researchers, we explain here in detail how we obtained them. The calculation is straightforward, and simply requires combining anatomical and physiological information about the macaque visual pathway. Similar information could be used to repeat the calculation for other species or modalities.

AB - In this method article, we show how to estimate of the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), and the number of lateral genicular nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) neurons involved in visual orientation discrimination tasks. We reported the results of this calculation in Kanitscheider et al. (2015), where we were interested in comparing the number of neurons in the visual periphery versus visual cortex for a specific experiment. This calculation allows estimation of the information content at different stages of the visual pathway, which can be used to assess the efficiency of the computations performed. As these numbers are generally not readily available but may be useful to other researchers, we explain here in detail how we obtained them. The calculation is straightforward, and simply requires combining anatomical and physiological information about the macaque visual pathway. Similar information could be used to repeat the calculation for other species or modalities.

KW - Population coding

KW - Vision

KW - Visual cortex

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039925188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039925188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.12688/f1000research.12398.1

DO - 10.12688/f1000research.12398.1

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85039925188

VL - 6

JO - F1000Research

JF - F1000Research

SN - 2046-1402

M1 - 1752

ER -