A longitudinal study of serum insulin and glucose levels in relation to colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women

G. C. Kabat, Mimi Kim, Howard Strickler, J. M. Shikany, D. Lane, J. Luo, Y. Ning, M. J. Gunter, Thomas E. Rohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is unclear whether circulating insulin or glucose levels are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. Few prospective studies have examined this question, and only one study had repeated measurements. Methods: We conducted a prospective study of colorectal cancer risk using the subsample of women in the Women's Health Initiative study whose fasting blood samples, collected at baseline and during follow-up, were analysed for insulin and glucose. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess associations with colorectal cancer risk in both baseline and time-dependent covariates analyses. Results: Among 4902 non-diabetic women with baseline fasting serum insulin and glucose values, 81 incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified over 12 years of follow-up. Baseline glucose levels were positively associated with colorectal cancer and colon cancer risk: multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) comparing the highest (>99.5 mg dl -1) with the lowest tertile (<89.5 mg dl -1): 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-3.15 and 2.25, 95% CI: 1.12-4.51, respectively. Serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment were not associated with risk. Analyses of repeated measurements supported the baseline results. Conclusion: These data suggest that elevated serum glucose levels may be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-232
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2012

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms
Insulin
Glucose
Serum
Colonic Neoplasms
Fasting
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Women's Health
Proportional Hazards Models
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • colorectal cancer
  • glucose
  • homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance
  • serum insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

A longitudinal study of serum insulin and glucose levels in relation to colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women. / Kabat, G. C.; Kim, Mimi; Strickler, Howard; Shikany, J. M.; Lane, D.; Luo, J.; Ning, Y.; Gunter, M. J.; Rohan, Thomas E.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 106, No. 1, 03.01.2012, p. 227-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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