A hospital-based educational approach to increase live donor kidney transplantation among blacks and hispanics

Ixel Cervera, Mencia Gomez De Vargas, Carlos M. Cortes, Sayeeda Ahsanuddin, Monica De Feao, Patricia McDonough, Carmen Velez, Jiyoung Kim, Paula Marcus, Liise K. Kayler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Little research is available on interventions to reduce racial/ethnic disparities in living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Material/Methods: Active kidney candidates and a guest at 1 center in New York were invited to attend 2 different hospital-based educational approaches including: (1) a pre-transplant support group (SG) providing nonspecific transplant education (n=34) and (2) a didactic educational class specifically aimed at LDKT education (LDE) (n=75). The LDE intervention was culturally sensitive for Hispanics, including using a Spanish-speaking minority health educator. Follow-up was 10 months. Results: The LDE group had significantly more candidates that: had a married/domestic partner (61.3% vs. 23.5%), attended with a guest (54.1% vs. 27.3%), knew their list status (active vs. inactive; (53.3% vs. 26.5%), were in a higher stage of readiness for LDKT (stage 4 or 5=33.9% vs. 13.7%), and were somewhat more likely to be Hispanic (41.3% vs. 32.3%) compared to controls. LDE resulted in somewhat more potential donors contacting our center (14.7% vs. 2.9%, p=0.0994), presenting for evaluation (6.7% vs. 0%, p=0.3220), and proceeding with donation (2.6% vs. 0%, p=1.0). The LDE live donor inquiry rate was 22.6% for Hispanics and 15.4% for blacks. Conclusions: These results suggest that a LDKT-specific education program, especially if culturally sensitive, can overcome some barriers to LDKT in minorities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
JournalClinical and Experimental Medical Letters
Volume56
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2015

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Hispanic Americans
Kidney Transplantation
Living Donors
Tissue Donors
Education
Minority Health
Health Educators
Transplants
Self-Help Groups
Spouses
Kidney
Research

Keywords

  • Education
  • Kidney Transplantation
  • Minority Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Oncology
  • Endocrinology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Cervera, I., De Vargas, M. G., Cortes, C. M., Ahsanuddin, S., De Feao, M., McDonough, P., ... Kayler, L. K. (2015). A hospital-based educational approach to increase live donor kidney transplantation among blacks and hispanics. Clinical and Experimental Medical Letters, 56, 43-52. https://doi.org/10.12659/MST.892986

A hospital-based educational approach to increase live donor kidney transplantation among blacks and hispanics. / Cervera, Ixel; De Vargas, Mencia Gomez; Cortes, Carlos M.; Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; De Feao, Monica; McDonough, Patricia; Velez, Carmen; Kim, Jiyoung; Marcus, Paula; Kayler, Liise K.

In: Clinical and Experimental Medical Letters, Vol. 56, 10.03.2015, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cervera, I, De Vargas, MG, Cortes, CM, Ahsanuddin, S, De Feao, M, McDonough, P, Velez, C, Kim, J, Marcus, P & Kayler, LK 2015, 'A hospital-based educational approach to increase live donor kidney transplantation among blacks and hispanics', Clinical and Experimental Medical Letters, vol. 56, pp. 43-52. https://doi.org/10.12659/MST.892986
Cervera, Ixel ; De Vargas, Mencia Gomez ; Cortes, Carlos M. ; Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda ; De Feao, Monica ; McDonough, Patricia ; Velez, Carmen ; Kim, Jiyoung ; Marcus, Paula ; Kayler, Liise K. / A hospital-based educational approach to increase live donor kidney transplantation among blacks and hispanics. In: Clinical and Experimental Medical Letters. 2015 ; Vol. 56. pp. 43-52.
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abstract = "Background: Little research is available on interventions to reduce racial/ethnic disparities in living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Material/Methods: Active kidney candidates and a guest at 1 center in New York were invited to attend 2 different hospital-based educational approaches including: (1) a pre-transplant support group (SG) providing nonspecific transplant education (n=34) and (2) a didactic educational class specifically aimed at LDKT education (LDE) (n=75). The LDE intervention was culturally sensitive for Hispanics, including using a Spanish-speaking minority health educator. Follow-up was 10 months. Results: The LDE group had significantly more candidates that: had a married/domestic partner (61.3{\%} vs. 23.5{\%}), attended with a guest (54.1{\%} vs. 27.3{\%}), knew their list status (active vs. inactive; (53.3{\%} vs. 26.5{\%}), were in a higher stage of readiness for LDKT (stage 4 or 5=33.9{\%} vs. 13.7{\%}), and were somewhat more likely to be Hispanic (41.3{\%} vs. 32.3{\%}) compared to controls. LDE resulted in somewhat more potential donors contacting our center (14.7{\%} vs. 2.9{\%}, p=0.0994), presenting for evaluation (6.7{\%} vs. 0{\%}, p=0.3220), and proceeding with donation (2.6{\%} vs. 0{\%}, p=1.0). The LDE live donor inquiry rate was 22.6{\%} for Hispanics and 15.4{\%} for blacks. Conclusions: These results suggest that a LDKT-specific education program, especially if culturally sensitive, can overcome some barriers to LDKT in minorities.",
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AU - De Feao, Monica

AU - McDonough, Patricia

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