A common sequence motif associated with recombination hot spots and genome instability in humans

Simon Myers, Colin Freeman, Adam Auton, Peter Donnelly, Gil McVean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

297 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In humans, most meiotic crossover events are clustered into short regions of the genome known as recombination hot spots. We have previously identified DNA motifs that are enriched in hot spots, particularly the 7-mer CCTCCCT. Here we use the increased hot-spot resolution afforded by the Phase 2 HapMap and novel search methods to identify an extended family of motifs based around the degenerate 13-mer CCNCCNTNNCCNC, which is critical in recruiting crossover events to at least 40% of all human hot spots and which operates on diverse genetic backgrounds in both sexes. Furthermore, these motifs are found in hypervariable minisatellites and are clustered in the breakpoint regions of both disease-causing nonallelic homologous recombination hot spots and common mitochondrial deletion hot spots, implicating the motif as a driver of genome instability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1124-1129
Number of pages6
JournalNature Genetics
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Genomic Instability
Genetic Recombination
HapMap Project
Minisatellite Repeats
Nucleotide Motifs
Homologous Recombination
Genome
Genetic Background

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

A common sequence motif associated with recombination hot spots and genome instability in humans. / Myers, Simon; Freeman, Colin; Auton, Adam; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gil.

In: Nature Genetics, Vol. 40, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 1124-1129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Myers, S, Freeman, C, Auton, A, Donnelly, P & McVean, G 2008, 'A common sequence motif associated with recombination hot spots and genome instability in humans', Nature Genetics, vol. 40, no. 9, pp. 1124-1129. https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.213
Myers, Simon ; Freeman, Colin ; Auton, Adam ; Donnelly, Peter ; McVean, Gil. / A common sequence motif associated with recombination hot spots and genome instability in humans. In: Nature Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 40, No. 9. pp. 1124-1129.
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