A case series of patients with cor triatriatum dexter: unique cause of neonatal cyanosis

Chad A. Mackman, Jennifer L. Liedel, Ronald K. Woods, Margaret M. Samyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cor triatriatum dexter is a rare congenital heart defect that can lead to cyanosis in a newborn with an otherwise normal exam. The initial evaluation of these patients typically focuses on searching for a pulmonary etiology for arterial desaturation, which often leads to a negative work up. When cardiac evaluation is performed, it may be challenging because the heart lesion can be difficult to visualize on an echocardiogram. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and thorough echocardiographic imaging. Once diagnosed, surgical repair can alleviate the shunt created by the defect. This case series describes all patients (3) with cor triatriatum dexter seen at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from 2000 to 2013.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-243
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Cardiology
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Cor Triatriatum
Cyanosis
Congenital Heart Defects
Newborn Infant
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A case series of patients with cor triatriatum dexter : unique cause of neonatal cyanosis. / Mackman, Chad A.; Liedel, Jennifer L.; Woods, Ronald K.; Samyn, Margaret M.

In: Pediatric Cardiology, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 240-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackman, Chad A. ; Liedel, Jennifer L. ; Woods, Ronald K. ; Samyn, Margaret M. / A case series of patients with cor triatriatum dexter : unique cause of neonatal cyanosis. In: Pediatric Cardiology. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 240-243.
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