A blind spot in the eye of imaging technology

Penetrating atheromatous ulcer

Jorge E. Romero, Arpit Shah, Aleksandr Korniyenko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term that is used to describe a similar clinical profile that may have different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. It includes classic aortic dissection, intramural aortic hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We describe the case of a 77-year-old female who presented with syncope of unknown duration. The chest X-ray was suggestive of a widened mediastinum. The initial work-up with a computed tomography scan and transesophageal echocardiogram failed to diagnose a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We discuss the importance of a high degree of clinical suspicion for AAS and the utility of different imaging technologies in making the diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-325
Number of pages4
JournalHellenic Journal of Cardiology
Volume54
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Optic Disk
Ulcer
Technology
Syncope
Mediastinum
Hematoma
Dissection
Thorax
Tomography
X-Rays

Keywords

  • Acute aortic syndrome
  • Aortic dissection
  • Chest pain
  • Pericardial effusion
  • Syncope

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

A blind spot in the eye of imaging technology : Penetrating atheromatous ulcer. / Romero, Jorge E.; Shah, Arpit; Korniyenko, Aleksandr.

In: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 07.2013, p. 322-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romero, Jorge E. ; Shah, Arpit ; Korniyenko, Aleksandr. / A blind spot in the eye of imaging technology : Penetrating atheromatous ulcer. In: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 322-325.
@article{75fed828723044c2baded71d45c6ae08,
title = "A blind spot in the eye of imaging technology: Penetrating atheromatous ulcer",
abstract = "Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term that is used to describe a similar clinical profile that may have different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. It includes classic aortic dissection, intramural aortic hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We describe the case of a 77-year-old female who presented with syncope of unknown duration. The chest X-ray was suggestive of a widened mediastinum. The initial work-up with a computed tomography scan and transesophageal echocardiogram failed to diagnose a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We discuss the importance of a high degree of clinical suspicion for AAS and the utility of different imaging technologies in making the diagnosis.",
keywords = "Acute aortic syndrome, Aortic dissection, Chest pain, Pericardial effusion, Syncope",
author = "Romero, {Jorge E.} and Arpit Shah and Aleksandr Korniyenko",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "322--325",
journal = "Hellenic Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "1109-9666",
publisher = "Hellenic Cardiological Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A blind spot in the eye of imaging technology

T2 - Penetrating atheromatous ulcer

AU - Romero, Jorge E.

AU - Shah, Arpit

AU - Korniyenko, Aleksandr

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term that is used to describe a similar clinical profile that may have different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. It includes classic aortic dissection, intramural aortic hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We describe the case of a 77-year-old female who presented with syncope of unknown duration. The chest X-ray was suggestive of a widened mediastinum. The initial work-up with a computed tomography scan and transesophageal echocardiogram failed to diagnose a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We discuss the importance of a high degree of clinical suspicion for AAS and the utility of different imaging technologies in making the diagnosis.

AB - Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term that is used to describe a similar clinical profile that may have different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. It includes classic aortic dissection, intramural aortic hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We describe the case of a 77-year-old female who presented with syncope of unknown duration. The chest X-ray was suggestive of a widened mediastinum. The initial work-up with a computed tomography scan and transesophageal echocardiogram failed to diagnose a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. We discuss the importance of a high degree of clinical suspicion for AAS and the utility of different imaging technologies in making the diagnosis.

KW - Acute aortic syndrome

KW - Aortic dissection

KW - Chest pain

KW - Pericardial effusion

KW - Syncope

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881082416&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881082416&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 322

EP - 325

JO - Hellenic Journal of Cardiology

JF - Hellenic Journal of Cardiology

SN - 1109-9666

IS - 4

ER -