9-Aminocamptothecin (9-AC) given as a 120-hour continuous infusion in patients with advanced adenocarcinomas of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction: A phase II trial of the University of Chicago phase II consortium

Hedy L. Kindler, Anjali Avadhani, Kurombi Wade-Oliver, Theodore Karrison, Sridhar Mani, Everett E. Vokes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

9-Aminocamptothecin (9-AC) is a water-insoluble camptothecin derivative that demonstrated broad activity in pre-clinical studies. In vitro, greater anti-tumor efficacy can be achieved with prolonged administration. A minor response was observed in gastric cancer in a phase I study. We conducted a phase II study of 9-AC in 15 patients with previously untreated metastatic gastric cancer and adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction. 9-AC was administered at a dose of 25 μg/m2/h over 120 hours (3000 μg/m2 over 5 days) on two consecutive weeks every 21 days. Fourteen patients were evaluable for response. There were no objective responses. Three patients had stable disease lasting a median of 3.4 months (range 1.6-4.3 months). Median time to progression was 1.4 months; median survival was 5.2 months. Grade 3 neutropenia developed in 20% of patients, and anemia in 7%. Grade 3 nausea and fatigue each developed in 7% of patients. We conclude that 9-AC given by 120-hour continuous infusion demonstrates no clinical activity in patients with metastatic gastric cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-327
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigational New Drugs
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Keywords

  • 9-aminocamptothecin
  • Clinical trial
  • Gastric cancer
  • Gastroesophageal junction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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