PREVENTION RESEARCH ON SOCIAL SUPPORT IN MINORITY GROUPS

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Social supports has been frequently implicated as a mediating
variable between stress and psychological symptoms. As a result,
interventions manipulating social support systems of high-risk
individuals are a common prevention strategy. As a prelude to
program development, this study intends to:

1) describe the amounts, types and sources of natural support
available to inner-city mothers of chronically ill children and to
describe how patterns of support change over time;

2) to identify factors associated with the availability of support
to mothers, specifically (a) the intensity of the stressor (measured
by the functional incapacity of the child and level of care the
child requires); (b) the chronicity of the stressor (acutely ill vs.
chronically ill child); (c) presence of other stressors in the
mother's life; (d) race/ethic group;

3) analyze how type, amount and sources of support are related
to psychological symptomatology in mothers.

A prospective longitudinal design is adopted. Over a five-year
period we plan to interview 200 mothers whose children are newly
diagnosed with a chronic illness and 200 with an acutely ill child
and to reinterview them twice at 5 months and 11 months post-
diagnosis.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/901/1/90

Funding

  • National Institute of Mental Health

ASJC

  • Psychology(all)

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