MEMBRANES AND MEMBRANE TRANSPORT

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

This is proposal for support for a FASEB Summer Research Conference on
Membranes and Membrane Transport Phenomena in Neoplasia. Membrane
transport of anti-cancer agents has been a very important but often elusive
aspect of cancer pharmacology. Since most drugs act on targets within
cells, membrane transport is a requisite for drug action. Hence, transport
has been shown to be a critical element in drug cytotoxicity and a key
factor in acquired and natural drug resistance. An area of recent interest
is in the role of membrane transport in pleiotropic drug resistance
involving several classes of agents. Despite the importance of membrane
transport in drug action, however, little is known about transport
properties for highly potent drugs such as the antracyclines and the
mechanisms by which membrane transport alterations result in reduced
cellular uptake of drugs in the pleiotropic drug resistance phenomenon.
One factor that limits progress in studies on membrane transport of
anti-cancer drugs is the lack of involvement of physiologists and
biophysicists who have as a primary interest basic aspects of transport
processes. This FASEB Conference is designed to bring together investigators with a
primary interest in the membrane transport of anti-cancer drugs and the
role of cell membranes in the neoplastic process with investigators who
have a primary interest in basic aspects of membrane phenomena-kinetics,
thermodynamics, transduction processes and molecular biology. Critical
issues in the transport of anti-cancer drugs will be addressed within the
context of state of the art lectures on basic processes that involve the
cell membrane. There will be considerable focus on the role of cell
membranes in the transcuction of signals initiated at the cell surface and
the relationship of these events to cell transformation and
differentiation. The conference will consider cytotoxic nucleosides,
antifolates and the pleiotropic drug resistance problem. The role of
membrane transport as a determinent of drug action will be explored.
Cloning of membrane transport carrier genes will be reviewed and
extrapolation to studies to identify genes for anti-cancer drug carriers
will be considered. We hope to attract the attention of the broader "transport and membrane
community" to problems in anti-cancer drug transport and other issues that
relate to the role of the cell membrane in neoplastic processes.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/15/866/14/87

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)