Molecular Basis of Early Childhood Obesity Programming by Intrauterine Growth Restriction

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Public Health Relevance Obesity is an epidemic in the US that has a devastating impact on health and mortality. More than one third of US children are overweight or obese. Intrauterine growth restricted infants are at high risk for the development of obesity and other metabolic diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying developmental programming of childhood obesity are poorly understood; however, epigenomic alterations during fetal life have been proposed to be important regulators of the child's phenotype. Immune cells, including T-cells and monocytes, play a key role in obesity pathogenesis. By studying whether DNA methylation and functional profiles of CD3+ T-cells mediate the association of intrauterine growth restriction with the development of adiposity in the first 24-months of life, we will characterize `obesity risk' stratifying biomarkers of early childhood obesity. Identification of stable biomarkers of `obesity risk' early in life can be used both for prediction of later obesity and to monitor the effects of preventive therapies as well as interventions.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date3/1/182/28/23

Funding

  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: $678,657.00
  • National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: $610,900.00
  • National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: $3,091,712.00
  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: $209,613.00

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