HARVARD NATHAN SHOCK CENTER IN BASIC BIOLOGY OF AGING

  • Vijg, Jan (PI)
  • Wei, Jeanne (PI)
  • Lipsitz, Lewis (PI)
  • Calkins, David (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

In order to support research on basic biology of aging, Harvard Medical School's Division on Aging and its affiliated institutions propose to establish an NIA-funded Nathan Shock Basic Biology of Aging Center. The goals of this proposed Center are to provide state-of-the-art infrastructure, resources and services for basic scientists to study the molecular basis of the aging process and the development of age-associated diseases. More specifically, the research resource cores proposed are designed to facilitate and further accelerate the aggressive pursuit of hypotheses concerning the genetics of aging, from the molecule to the organism. As examples, the Center will support investigations on DNA instabilities as potential causal factors in cancer and aging, gene expression changes during aging and disease, and the role of aging and longevity genes in determining healthy lifespan. Three Research Resource cores are proposed: (1) Analysis of Gene Mutations; (2) Gene Transcript Recovery and Gene Development; and (3) Transgenetic and Genetic Model Systems. In addition to technical services and resources, these cores will also provide training courses on subjects in molecular gerontology. In addition, a Research Development Core, will provide a complete training program for junior faculty interested in aging research, and encourage senior faculty in other disciplines to consider applying their expertise to questions in aging, and a program Enrichment Core will provide administrative oversight, organize workshops and special seminars, promote utilization of Core facilities, develop an international network of contacts, and seek long-term permanent sources of funding.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date4/1/976/30/01

Funding

  • National Institute on Aging

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